An Educational SDN Use Case

lcaywood:

I was going to blog about Tom’s comments on the VMunderground Networking panel–which were the highlight of the panel, to me–during the week of VMworld. But I wanted to include the video, which only got posted recently. Fortunately for all, Tom has further elaborated his thoughts AND included the video on his own blog, which I’ve shared below.

Originally posted on The Networking Nerd:

During the VMUnderground Networking Panel, we had a great discussion about software defined networking (SDN) among other topics. Seems that SDN is a big unknown for many out there. One of the reasons for this is the lack of specific applications of the technology. OSPF and SQL are things that solve problems. Can the same be said of SDN? One specific question regarded how to use SDN in small-to-medium enterprise shops. I fired off an answer from my own experience:

Since then, I’ve had a few people using my example with regards to a great use case for SDN. I decided that I needed to develop it a bit more now that I’ve had time to think about it.

Schools are a great example of the kinds of “do more with less” organizations that are becoming more common. They have enterprise-class networks and needs and live off budgets that…

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By lcaywood

On Success and Happiness

Robin Williams died today. Normally I don’t give much thought to celebrity deaths—what about all the other people who died today? is my usual unvoiced response to the expressions of sadness that promptly pour out on social media. But this one struck me for a few different reasons.

Much of my generation of Americans grew up with Williams in his most goofy and manic role, Mork from Ork. His later roles, even the relatively serious ones, continued to be driven by the manic motormouth compulsion that first brought him fame. They were leavened by an increasing humanity, but it was clear that giving free rein to his frenetic free association was what really energized him. I had the opportunity to seem him live twice—he lived in Marin and would occasionally test out new material at a smallish club in San Francisco—and his barely contained energy, which would grow over the evening as he got going, was practically a force of a nature that swept everyone in the room along with him. It’s hard to imagine Williams surviving, yet alone thriving, in any other profession. Watching him live, I became convinced that Mork the alien was the real Williams, and that he spent much of his later years trying to figure out how to be human. His more touching moments on screen typically had to do with realizing and articulating a failure to be what other characters needed his to be. Continue reading

Response: Open Networking: The Whale That Swallowed SDN

Art Fewell, whose views I greatly respect, has written a very good post on Network World entitled “Open Networking: The Whale That Swallowed SDN“. It’s a great historical summary of SDN 2011-present, with some noteworthy areas of concern. I agree with the general thrust of Art’s thesis, yet at many points I found myself thinking “Yeah, but…” I started to write a few comments on the Network World page, but the comments turned into a page, so here we are.

Here’s what I really liked in Art’s piece: Continue reading

The Most Successful Network Startup of 2014

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By lcaywood

Rant Addendum: Radical Deperimeterization

This is part 5 of an occasional series. The initial post is here.

At the end of my marketing rant a few weeks ago, I suggested that corporations might need to reimagine their places in the universe in order to be effective in the new marketing world order—not as central sources of information, but as minor nodes in a much larger network.

I know, I know. That’s kind of a big blow to the corporate ego. But let’s be honest, with few exceptions, potential and even actual users of your products just aren’t that into you. They may like your products just fine because they serve a useful purpose somehow. That’s a different thing than being into a “brand” in itself. But so what? Everybody talks about customer-centricity and solution selling, right? So what really needs to change?

Well, almost everything about how a typical corporation runs, really. Continue reading

Some Formative Sources of My Ideas About Technology

I was musing recently about things I’ve read or otherwise consumed that have stuck with me over the years, things that I keep finding myself coming back to as I work through various ideas about technology innovation and adoption. I thought I would share some long-time favorites–mostly because I think they’re inherently interesting, but also because it might provide some context for other things I write on this blog. Links are provided for the curious. Continue reading

By lcaywood

Thoughts on SDN Consumability

I’ve been using the phrase “SDN consumability” here and there of late, assuming that there was nothing particularly revolutionary in the idea. The response, however, is typically a cocked head, an interested look, and a question: “What do you mean by that?”

So here’s what I mean by that:

In order for SDN to see mainstream adoption, SDN solutions need to be/have

  • Simple to operate – easy to deploy, low-to-moderate learning curve
  • Safe and reliable – tech is stable, nothing blows up, no one gets fired
  • No blue-sky requirements, limited DIY – tech and process migration support available

Continue reading

Rant: The Internet Killed the Traditional Marketer

This is part 4 of a five-part series. Read part 1 here. Read part 5 here.

The match that lit this was a comment Ethan Banks made in his latest anti-Klout post:

If you’re in marketing, you need a better way to discover who the influencers are. My recommendation is to engage in the communities you want to market to. Make friends with those people. Find out who matters. It’s more work, but you’ll end up with something much more nuanced and real than a Klout score. You’ll have a relationship with a human being who knows other human beings. That’s where social is *really* at. Community – it’s not just a word.

I read that, set it to stewing on a back burner of my mind, and went back to editing whitepapers. But only for so long. Continue reading

A Bit More on Brand and Communities for Techies

This became part 3ish of a five-part series, part 2 being the Geek Whisperers podcast linked to below. Read part 1 here. Read part 4 here.

The Geek Whisperers were kind enough to invite me to join their podcast a couple of weeks back to talk about vendor-hosted communities as part of the marketing & sales mix. They just posted the results today. We wound up talking more than I expected about “the B word” (Branding). I suppose I shouldn’t have been surprised by this, since the whole point of the blog post that kicked off the G-W connection was that certs and these types of communities are built to foster brand loyalty.

Nonetheless, I found this sort of funny since the Branding department tends to be the bane of every product marketer’s existence. They make us spell out things like “Cisco Unified Computing System” or “VMware vCenter Operations Manager” in everything we write even though it makes for really awkward sentences and nobody in the real world ever refers to the products that way anyway. This is a very typical case where official Corporate Branding actually gets in the way of a product acquiring and building on an organic identity within its user base. If your users fondly refer to your product–officially known, let’s say, as the Fortuna Unified Zazzle Zapper 3627–as “FUZZ3k”…go with it sometimes.. Continue reading

The Legend of SDN: One Controller to Rule Them All

I originally posted this just over a year ago (Feb 5, 2013) on my corporate blog. I’m reposting here now because the subject of “master controllers” and federation is coming up again more insistently as users begin to think through how to implement a controller-based architecture. I expect to be writing more on this soon.

As we enter the second(ish) Year of SDN, we’ve gone from irrational exuberance to some semblance of reality, with some first-generation products starting to come to market now. That will inevitably drive more reality, on the user side, but an embrace of reality may take a bit longer on the vendor side. I say that because there are still plenty of “whoever wins the controller wars wins all” notions being promulgated in various forums. Continue reading